Past Grantees

Research Group

Institute

Proposed Research

Noam Sobel

The Weizmann Institute

The nasal cycle: a novel indicator and regulator of mood and cognition

Hossam Haick

Technion

Autonomous sensing patch for non-invasive and real-time evaluation of stress

 

Lital Alfonta & Rafael Shikler

Ben Gurion University

Dopamine wearable self-fueled sweat biosensor

Amir Amedi

Hebrew University

Bridging the gap between body, mind and emotion- elucidating the representations of brain maps in the brain’s self-referential networks

Rony Paz

The Weizmann Institute

The contribution of exploration and uncertainty to ‘normal’ anxiety and well-being: a neural-circuits approach

Yael Yaniv & Assaf Schuster

Technion

Deconstructing the heart-brain coherence protocol: emotions and cardiac activity

Yoni Pertzov, Hillel Aviezer & Shlomo Israel

Hebrew University

Eye to eye: identification and remediation of social-communication deficits using eye movements

Rafi Malach

The Weizmann Institute

Neuronal mechanisms underlying creativity in the human brain

Tom Schonberg, Jonathan Berant & Aya Meltzer-Asscher

Tel Aviv University

Remote sensing of negative mood tendencies and enhancing resilience in the general population: advanced computational models, novel behavioral tasks, eye-tracking, virtual reality and physiological measures 

Oren Shriki

Ben Gurion University

Neuromarkers for emotional resilience and vulnerability to sleep deprivation

Ayelet Landau

Hebrew University

Individual differences in rhythmic cognition: a key to optimal experience

Researcher, PI

Institute

Proposed Research

Profs. Asya Rolls & Talma Hendler

Technion + Tel Aviv University

Reward system activity using NF – Develop a new strategy to activate reward system activity using NF. Then, we will examine how such brain modulation affects the immune response

Drs. Dafna Fisher-Gewirtzman, Shamay-Tsoory S., Peled-Avron L. & Chen E

Technion

Perfect architectural design for urban dwellers

Dr. Doron Friedman

Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya

Towards Reliable Monitoring and Machine Induced Regulation of Stress in Every Day Life using Highly Immersive Virtual Reality

Dr. Michael Gilead

Ben Gurion University

Examining the Effectiveness of a Mentalizing-Based Emotion Regulation Intervention in Laboratory and Ambulatory Settings

Drs. Sigal Zilcha-Mano & Hadas Okon-Singer

Haifa University

What can the brain teach us about effective cognitive training: Using machine learning and fMRI in search of effective personalized training to improve wellbeing

Prof. Yair Bar-Haim

Tel Aviv University

Reducing of Social Anxiety – A Novel Translational Therapeutic Approach to the Reducing of Social Anxiety in Clinically and Sub-Clinically Afflicted Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Interrogation of Potential Neuromarkers of Treatment Efficacy via Gaze-Contingent Music Reward Therapy

Dr. Ziv Ardi

Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya

Identifying & isolating the wellbeing-promoting components of mindfulness practice

Dino Levy PhD, Ori- Ossmy PhD, Tal Sela - PhD

Tel Aviv University

EEG-tACS closed loop technology for enhancing emotional wellbeing

Prof. Talma Hendler

Prof. Talma Hendler

Talma Hendler (MD, PhD) is a professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University, and the founding director of the Tel Aviv Center for Brain Functions at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. Dr Hendler holds an MD from Tel Aviv University, a PhD from SUNY at Stony Brook, NY and completed 2 years of her post-doctoral studies at the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH). She has mentored over 50 post-doctoral, doctoral and master students, published over 160 articles and has been awarded several large scale national and international competitive grants over the last decade. Throughout her scientific career she has been applying advanced brain imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Diffusion Tensor imaging (DTI) intracranial and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic encephalography (MEG) to study processing in the healthy and diseased human brain. Her research theme has focused on identifying and portraying the neural underpins of individual emotional experience and expression and their relation to mental and somatic health. Using multimodal imaging and advanced algorithms, Dr. Hendler’s has developed and investigated new imaging technologies of fMRI-inspired EEG and applied with Brain Computer Interface paradigms for the prevention and cure of mental suffering.

Prof. Kobi Rosenblum

Prof. Kobi Rosenblum is the head of the Laboratory for Research of Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory (since 2001) in the Sagol Dept. of Neurobiology, University of Haifa, which he has cofounded and chaired for 10 years. The laboratory currently consists of four research associates, four post docs and five post graduate students.  Prof. Rosenblum is also head of the center of Gene Manipulation in the Brain, University of Haifa since its foundation in 2009. In his research, Prof. Rosenblum focuses on molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In addition, his research aims at gaining insight regarding targets for cognitive enhancement and treatments for brain disease, using advanced methods spanning molecular biology, advanced microscope imaging, electrophysiology, and behavioral assays. He holds M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the Dept. of Neurobiology, Feinberg Graduate School, Weizmann Institute of Science (Cum Laude). Prof. Rosenblum has been a postdoctoral EMBO fellow at the Neuroscience Institute of the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, and later a research associate with a Royal Society Fellowship at the same institute. He has co-authored over 70 peer-reviewed scientific papers, three book chapters, four patents in the field of neuroscience and one start-up company was established based on his lab research. Throughout his career, Prof. Rosenblum has been awarded numerous prestigious fellowships, grant, and awards.

Prof. Kobi Rosenblum

Dr. Nava Levit Binnun

Dr. Nava Levit Binnun

Dr. Nava Levit Binnun is the director of the Sagol Center for Brain and Mind, and the founder and director of the Muda Institute for Mindfulness, Science and Society at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. The research in Sagol Center aims to understand the qualities underlying healthy brains and minds such as brain resilience, interpersonal interactions, self-awareness, mindfulness, compassion and friendship, integrating tools from physics, neuroscience, psychology and phenomenology. In order to understand what it means to be psychologically healthy and how we can nurture this health the Sagol Center studies both individuals with psychopathology (autism, schizophrenia and ADHD) and individuals considered “healthy”.
Dr. Levit-Binnun runs the Sagol Center from a deep belief that neuroscientists are not only capable of but are obligated to making the world a better place. Accordingly, in 2009 she founded the Muda Institute for Mindfulness, Science and Society which operates as part of the Sagol Center. This institute focuses on promoting and implementing the vast knowledge accrued from neuroscientific research about our ability to nurture positive mental traits such as resilience, well-being, mindfulness and awareness, compassion and empathy, giving and caring and altruism and tolerance. The Muda Institute’s basic working assumption is that these traits are essential to our ability as individuals and as a society to deal with the personal, societal and political challenges facing us. Accordingly, the Muda Institute develops interventions and professional development programs aimed at creating agents of social change that will help develop and nurture positive mental traits in formal and non-formal educational, health, business, legal and public systems. To date, the Muda Institute has developed several mindfulness-based programs, has trained over 100 mindfulness instructors, and has worked with more than 400 school teachers in both Jewish and Arab schools.
Dr. Levit-Binnun believes that in order to be able to ask interesting questions related to the deeper levels of human experience, researchers should develop contemplative tools (contemplation means “creating a space for observation”) that allows observation of one’s inner experiences in a non-judgmental way. Advanced contemplative methods enable the discovery of mental phenomena which are not always accessible to awareness in our daily lives, but are crucial to widening our knowledge of the human mind. In line with this, she has been studying Yoga and Buddhist meditations for over 20 years, and has completed a 3-year Yoga instructor course and a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Teacher training course. She teaches mindfulness to psychology students as part of an academic course in the last 8 years.